Mitochondria-to-nucleus communication controls mitochondrial activity and stress resistance in yeast

Redoxoma Highlights | Mitochondria-to-nucleus communication controls mitochondrial activity and stress resistance in yeast by Fernanda M. Cunha

by Fernanda M. Cunha

Mitochondria are believed to be former free living bacteria that established a successful symbiotic relationship with eukaryotic cells in such a way that today, besides being crucial for the biosynthesis of intermediary metabolites, calcium homeostasis, coordination of apoptosis and ATP synthesis, most mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear rather than mitochondrial DNA. In that scenario, communication pathways that relay signals from the nucleus to mitochondria as well as from mitochondria to the nucleus (the retrograde way) are mandatory to secure energetic and metabolic homeostasis. In yeast, the best characterized retrograde signaling pathway, activated whenever

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Peroxide signaling through thiol switches: chemical and biological aspects.

by Luis E. S. Netto

It is now well accepted that oxidants and other redox intermediates are not only damaging compounds, but also act as signaling molecules. This is especially evident for hydrogen peroxide, whose generation and degradation are finely regulated through multiple enzymatic systems. Proteins whose activities are based on Cysteine (Cys) residues are frequently reported to be oxidized in various biological systems in conditions where hydrogen peroxide is also generated. As the most parsimonious hypothesis, these proteins are frequently assumed to be directly oxidized by hydrogen peroxide, although this is not always supported by chemical data.

For instance, Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases

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