Mitochondria and lysosomes: lords of life and death in cells?

by Mauricio da Silva Baptista

An important aim of our CEPID-Redoxoma is to develop diagnostic and therapeutic applications of redox processes. In this context, antioxidant therapies are at the frontline of our interests as a group. In parallel, however, a smaller but nonetheless significant group of strategies aim to explore prooxidant and stress-enhancing effects of distinct interventions, mainly to achieve selective toxicity towards damaged or tumor cells. The group of Prof. Mauricio S. Baptisata, from our CEPID-Redoxoma, has been exploring for more than a decade photo-induced compounds as a means to achieve such type of effects. Interestingly, this group recently provided a significant contribution

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Redox Reactions and the Origin of Life

The Radical-Free Corner | Redox Reactions and the Origin Life  Alicia Kowaltowski

by Alicia Kowaltowski

Peter Mitchell was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of the chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis, a hypothesis he first published in 1961 [1]. Surprisingly, shortly before this seminal publication, Dr. Mitchell attended and wrote a paper for a symposium on the origins of life [2]. His scientific interests were obviously quite vast!

He was also a visionary: In his publication on the origins of life, Dr. Mitchell describes the importance of membranes, osmosis and the exchange of substances with the environment in the origins of life. He was spot on. Today, most early life evolution specialists agree that life

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Is cholesterol bad for mitochondria?

Cholesterol

by Sayuri Miyamoto

Cholesterol is an important component of cell membranes and plays essential structural and signaling roles. It is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and distributed to other cell membranes/compartments through a tightly regulated trafficking system involving vesicular and non-vesicular processes [1]. Cholesterol distribution among intra-cellular membranes is not homogeneous. Mitochondria are cholesterol-poor organelles (less than 5 %). However, mitochondrial cholesterol is increased in cancer cell lines and treatment of these cells with statins (cholesterol lowering drugs) increases their susceptibility to chemotherapy [2].

How mitochondrial cholesterol could influence

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