Is redox metabolism connected with Circadian Rhythm?

Highlights | Carolina G. FernandesIs redox metabolism connected with Circadian Rhythm?

by Carolina Gonçalves Fernandes

Circadian Rhythm is any biological process that temporally organizes behavioral, physiological, and molecular events around the 24h day-night cycle. This process has evolved over approximately 2.5 billion years ago at the Great Oxidation Event. The later involved increases in atmospheric oxygen levels that simulatenwously enabled organisms to resonate with their environment such that their internal cycles anticipate and match external rhythms on Earth. In mammals, this rhythmicity is controlled by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) receiving retina signals and “translating” them into each tissue/organ that commonly responds using the transcription/translation

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The complex relationship between omega-3 fatty acids and neurodegenerative diseases

by Sayuri Miyamoto

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is well known by its health-promoting effects. Being highly abundant in the brain, DHA displays essential role in neurological and visual development in infants. In adults, the decline of DHA content in brain has been associated to cognitive impairment and the use of omega-3 supplements have been thought to exert neuroprotective effects. Indeed, some studies indicated that consuming DHA would be beneficial for the prevention of cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease [1]. However, a recent clinical study involving 4000 participants has

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Together for ever…: Cross-linking of proteins by a ditryptophan bond

Cross-linking of proteins by a ditryptophan bond

by Verônica Paviani

Oxidative modifications of proteins are extensively investigated because proteins are major targets of radicals and oxidants under physiological conditions [1]. The amino acid residues most susceptible to oxidation are the sulfur-containing residues cysteine and methionine and the aromatic residues histidine, phenylalanine, tyrosine and tryptophan. The oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues is reversible and protein-cysteine oxidation is emerging as a fundamental cell regulatory mechanism. In contrast, the oxidation of all other protein residues is irreversible, and may result in loss of protein

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Free radicals: should clinicians pay attention to them?

by Protasio L. da Luz*

Within the Cepid-Redoxoma, we are deeply involved in redox research and we consider this very important, of course. However, it is interesting at times to see how some meaningful outsiders interpret the area. The Radical-Free Corner challenged a highly experienced academic clinician-scientist, who kindly accepted this task (he happens to have been the Editor’s doctorate supervisor – a minor conflict of interest, I confess)

(Editor’s comment)

Oxidative stress pervades several areas of Medicine: aging, cancer, atherosclerosis and other degenerative conditions, principally. Several studies claim that it is the cause of aging. But while there is evidence for

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