Calorie Restriction can protect the brain

Redoxcope: Interview | M. C. WiderCalorie Restriction Can Protect the Brain

by Maria Celia Wider

For decades, caloric restriction has been known to enhance longevity and the prevent age-related diseases. However, the processes responsible for these effects are not yet fully understood. Now, Redoxoma Network researchers have found the mechanism in which caloric restriction facilitates mitochondrial calcium retention capacity in the brain, resulting in protection against excitotoxic damage, which is related to neuronal loss in diseases such as stroke, Parkinson´s and Alzheimer’s. “Because we determined caloric restriction´s mechanism of action, we may be able to develop drugs to increase mitochondrial calcium uptake in mitochondria in a manner that is not dependent

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Education Page

During the event “II Virada Científica” promoted by University of São Paolo at October, 17th and 18th the CEPID-Redoxoma group was Involved in science diffusion activities. About 160 people visited our activities during the event. The contribution of Cepid Redoxoma occurred in promoting experiments in a dark room named “Free, radicals and light”, two lectures named The fat, the slim and healthy – a conversation about metabolism, Sex, Chemistry and Power and presenting two educational games – Electron Transport Chain and ChemCards. Experimental activities were designed for an audience of children, youth and adults, many of them families. Four experiments were conducted

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Redox Reactions and the Origin of Life

The Radical-Free Corner | Redox Reactions and the Origin Life  Alicia Kowaltowski

by Alicia Kowaltowski

Peter Mitchell was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his discovery of the chemiosmotic mechanism of ATP synthesis, a hypothesis he first published in 1961 [1]. Surprisingly, shortly before this seminal publication, Dr. Mitchell attended and wrote a paper for a symposium on the origins of life [2]. His scientific interests were obviously quite vast!

He was also a visionary: In his publication on the origins of life, Dr. Mitchell describes the importance of membranes, osmosis and the exchange of substances with the environment in the origins of life. He was spot on. Today, most early life evolution specialists agree that life

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Mitochondria can dictate your fate, especially if you’re a stem cell

Redoxoma Highlights | Mitochondria can dictate your fate, especially if you’re a stem cell  Maria F. Forni

by Maria F. Forni*

Known for over a century, mitochondria have become, during the last four decades, an important subject of research within several disciplines. This is mostly due to the fact that this organelle comprises the site of oxidative phosphorylation, the citric acid cycle, fatty acid oxidation, the urea cycle and the biosynthesis of iron-sulphur centres and haem. Moreover, mitochondria are an important redox-signaling node. Indeed, the bioenergetic status of a cell is dependent on the overall quality and relative abundance of the mitochondrial population it harbors. Recent evidence suggests that the control of mitochondrial mass and morphology occurs through the processes of fusion

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Mitochondria-to-nucleus communication controls mitochondrial activity and stress resistance in yeast

Redoxoma Highlights | Mitochondria-to-nucleus communication controls mitochondrial activity and stress resistance in yeast by Fernanda M. Cunha

by Fernanda M. Cunha

Mitochondria are believed to be former free living bacteria that established a successful symbiotic relationship with eukaryotic cells in such a way that today, besides being crucial for the biosynthesis of intermediary metabolites, calcium homeostasis, coordination of apoptosis and ATP synthesis, most mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear rather than mitochondrial DNA. In that scenario, communication pathways that relay signals from the nucleus to mitochondria as well as from mitochondria to the nucleus (the retrograde way) are mandatory to secure energetic and metabolic homeostasis. In yeast, the best characterized retrograde signaling pathway, activated whenever

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Saving the planet by eating healthier food

by Ignacio Amigo*

It is well established that as countries develop, their inhabitants change their alimentary habits from complex carbohydrates and fiber to diets with a higher proportion of fats, saturated fats and sugars, a phenomenon that has been termed “nutrition transition”. The link between these new food habits and the deterioration of health is notorious and underlies the great interest that consumers have developed in the last years over “organic” and “macrobiotic” aliments. Less obvious, but probably as important, is the association between the alimentary habits and greenhouse gases emissions. When we think about climate change, we usually picture big factories releasing

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The new roles of cardiolipin in ROS-mediated signalling

Cytochrome c

by Alberto Lévano-Martinez

Cardiolipin, the signature phospholipid of mitochondria, has been extensively studied as this organelle’s main structural and regulatory lipid. It exerts influential roles in the catalytic activity of key components of the oxidative phosphorylation under physiological conditions. However, recents advances in mitochondrial physiology have uncovered roles of this phospholipid in pathophysiological situations such as apoptosis, or in Barth syndrome. Cardiolipin anchors cytochrome c to the outer face of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which favors the electron transfer to the terminal component of the respiratory chain (Complex IV). However, during oxidative

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Alicia Kowaltowski wins the Capes-Elsevier award

Alicia Kowaltowski, Full Professor at the Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, and member of the INCT and CEPID of Redox Processes in biomedicine – Redoxoma, was one of the winners of 2014 Award Capes-Elsevier. The award ceremony was held at the Copacabana Palace in Rio de Janeiro, last May.

The award is a partnership between Elsevier and the Coordination of Improvement of Higher Education Personnel, Ministry of Education (CAPES / MEC). This year, ten women scientists received the award for their contribution to the development of science in Brazil.

The criteria for the selection of the winners was researchers who have impacted the scientific community, published articles

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