Mitochondrial metabolism and central nervous system dysregulation govern an overeating but low energy conversion efficiency response to intermittent-feeding

The ideal type of diet is a long-sought goal that has not been fulfilled so far, both for preventive as well as therapeutic purposes. At the same time, caloric restriction has been well demonstrated to afford increase in lifespan in several species. Intermittent feeding has been used as a substitute for caloric restriction both by overweight or obese individuals (frequently without medical supervision) or, experimentally, as a mechanistical tool to understand the physiology of lifespan extension. These intermittently-fed animals, indeed display decreased body mass, but surprisingly overall caloric intake is similar to that of ad libitum-fed animals. Work performed by the CEPID-Redoxoma

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Photochemistry in the dark governs pathways for singlet oxygen generation

Excited species such as singlet molecular oxygen [O2(1Δg)] and triplet carbonyls are a less understood subgroup of oxygen-derived oxidants in BioMedicine. Their generation has been associated to the detection of ultraweak chemiluminescence in mammalian tissues and there is emerging evidence for their roles in pathophysiological situations. However, pathways accounting for their generation in vivo have remained obscure, limiting the assessment of their biological roles. In vitro, excited species arise from photochemical processes involving direct excitation by light. However, atypical photochemical processes not involving photoexcitation have been proposed

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